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Tag: sweets

Tsubuan (sweet red bean paste)

Tsubuan (sweet red bean paste)

Sweetened red bean paste, or Tsubuan, is probably one of Japan’s most recognized sweet flavors. It’s used in mochi, ice cream, and pastries. It’s even delightful just spread on toast. You can find tsubuan in Asian markets, but it’s so much better when made from read more

Mango Sago

Mango Sago

  When I need a really fast, make ahead sweet, I reach for this Mango Sago. Especially now, when mangoes are at their peak. Even with all of the annoying squirrels racing to get their fair share, I still have plenty left to make this read more

Flag Cake

Flag Cake

Every Independence Day deserves a showstopper of a cake, and this Flag Cake delivers! My husband is from the Philippines, so we always like to have a little celebration to honor their Independence Day, which is June 12th. Filipinos actually have a second day, July 4th, commemorating the second time they earned their independence. But whichever day you decide to celebrate, flag cake is always welcome!

I know this recipe looks very difficult and maybe intimidating, but I promise you can do this. I am by no means a professional baker, and I’m far more comfortable on the savory side of things. I’ve made this recipe a few times now, and it always comes out beautifully, even with my limited baking skills. In fact, my daughters and I typically make this flag cake each year. It’s fun and lets us spend a lot of quality time together in the kitchen. So if you have kids, regardless of their age or baking experience, you can pull it off together!

While the recipe is long (over a thousand words!), that’s because I really break down each step. I assume that like me, you aren’t a professional baker and maybe make a cake once or twice a year. In fact, this Matcha Cake is the only other cake recipe I’ve ever posted. I detail every single step so you can approach it with confidence. Let’s get into it!

flag cake ingredients

My Baking 101 Tips

My baking trials and errors through the years have taught me a few key points:

  • The temperature of ingredients is very important in baking. Use room temperature eggs. If your eggs are straight from the fridge, put them in warm water for 10 minutes. Butter should also be room temperature, which means you should be able to make an indent if you push a finger into it. It should not be greasy soft. Better to start with butter that is a little too cold than squishy soft, which will not aerate properly. Put the butter back in the fridge for 10-15 minutes to harden if it’s too soft.
  • A kitchen scale is your best friend when baking because it is the most accurate. If you do not have one, make sure you always stir your dry ingredients before scooping. Never pack flour into a measuring cup. And always level off with the back of a butter knife if using the scooping method.
  • If you do not bake often, check the expiration date on your baking powder and baking soda. Many times old powders will be the reason your cake did not rise properly.
  • Preheating your oven is crucial. Turn on your oven before you start the recipe. If you do not have an automatic beeper letting you know your oven is ready, let your oven heat up for 30 minutes before you start baking.

Baking the Flag Cake

While I’m mixing the eggs and sugar, I heat the butter, oil and milk until the butter is melted and the milk is hot.

batter flag cake

I like to tap the cake on the counter several times so that the largest air bubbles come up to the surface and pop. This keep the crumb of the cake free of any large holes. Bake until the cake is golden brown and a toothpick stuck in the middle comes out clean, about 20-25 minutes. A good rule of thumb is to check it early, you can always bake more but you can’t unbake. Let the cake cool completely before frosting.

Flag Cake Frosting

If you look up Filipino flag cake, you will see a lot of beautiful flag cakes draped in fondant. Which may be lovely to look at it, but frankly fondant is kind of gross tasting. I wanted a delicious, creamy frosting for mine. I also don’t love frosting made with powdered sugar, I find it always has a weird, chemical aftertaste. And it’s often so sweet. So my flag cake frosting has all the good stuff-all the butter, real sugar, and dairy your heart could desire. This frosting is basically a sweet roux that is enriched with whipped butter. It’s satiny, creamy, and very stable. I think you’ll love it.

I start making the flag cake frosting by making a sweet roux. This is a very simple method but it requires a lot of stirring. Now is not the time to walk away from the stove. The roux thickens as it cooks and can easily stick to the bottom of the pan and burn.

dollops flag cake

Whip the cake flag frosting until it’s thick and creamy, about 3 minutes.

Once the frosting is done, it’s time to prep the fruit!

Flag Cake Fruit Topping

Luckily for us blueberries, mango, and strawberries not only are in season, but they also represent the colors of the Filipino flag. The berries get washed, dried and simply prepped.

strawberries flag cake

The mango gets cut into shapes to represent the flag’s sun and stars:

mango pit flag cake

Then using either biscuit or cookie cutters, cut out a circle and then stars.

Next, using the rest of the mango slices, cut 8 one inch strips and 16 smaller ones. These will be the flag cake’s sun rays.

mango strips flag cake

Now it’s time to put everything together!

Decorating the Flag Cake

Next you will sketch out the flag design in the frosting, using either a chopstick or bamboo skewer. This will just be a basic guide to help decorate with the fruit.

Using that guide, arrange the strawberries like shingles on the bottom half, mimicking the red part of the Filipino flag. Kids can help with this part.

tweezers flag cake

blueberries flag cake

 

Now you’re going to put the remainder of the frosting in a pastry bag and use it to pipe frosting along the edges of the flag cake to give it a sharp, crisp look.

flag cake piping

And with that, phew, you’re done! A magazine cover worthy Flag Cake, no pastry degree required. I can’t emphasize enough how NOT of a baker I am. If I can pull this off, you can too. And I know it seems like a lot of steps, but both the cake and the frosting can be made ahead of time, leaving just the decorating to do when you are ready to celebrate.

I really hope you give this Flag Cake a try, you will be pleasantly surprised by what you can do. Let us see those gorgeous cakes by tagging us @funkyasiankitchen, and please take a moment to rate and comment on the recipe below-we love hearing from you!

beauty flag cake

 

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recipe flag cake

Flag Cake

  • Author: Funky Asian Kitchen
  • Prep Time: 1 hour
  • Cook Time: 30 minutes
  • Total Time: 1 hour 30 minutes
  • Yield: serves 10-12 1x
  • Category: sweets
  • Cuisine: Filipino

Ingredients

Scale

For the Cake:

  • 2 cups all purpose flour (9 ounces)
  • 2 ½ teaspoons baking powder
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 4 room temperature large eggs
  • 1 ½ cup granulated sugar (10.5 ounces)
  • ½ cup (4 ounces) unsalted butter
  • 1 cup whole milk
  • 1 Tablespoon vanilla extract
  • 2 Tablespoons neutral oil

Fruit:

  • 3 ripe mangoes
  • ½ pound blueberries (1 pint)
  • ½ pound strawberries

Frosting:

  • 10 Tablespoons all purpose flour (3 ounces)
  • 1 ½ cups granulated sugar (10.5 ounces)
  • 2 cups whole milk
  • 2 cups unsalted butter (1 pound)
  • 1 Tablespoon vanilla extract
  • 2 dashes of salt

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 and place the shelf in the middle of the oven.
  2. Spray the inside of a 13×9 pan with nonstick baking spray or liberally butter and flour the pan. Line the bottom with parchment paper. Set aside until ready to use.
  3. Whisk the flour, baking powder, and salt together in a bowl to combine. Set aside.
  4. Beat the eggs for 1 minute on medium speed with the whisk attachment (6 on a stand/hand mixer).
  5. Add the sugar slowly in a stream, raise the speed to medium high (8 on a stand/hand mixer), and beat for 6-7 minutes, scraping the sides down with a rubber spatula once or twice.
  6. While you are whipping the eggs, heat the butter, oil, and the milk in a small pot over medium low heat. You can also put the milk, oil, and butter in the microwave and heat on high for 2 minutes if you prefer. (You want the butter to be melted and the milk hot, but not boiling.) Once the butter has melted, it’s basically ready to use (takes about 3-4 minutes). Keep the milk on low heat until you are ready to use it. You need it to be hot, not warmish.
  7. Once the eggs are done being whipped, add the flour mixture in thirds. First add ⅓ of the flour and mix on the lowest available speed (Stir or 1 on stand/hand mixer) for about 10 seconds, then add the second ⅓ and mix for 10 seconds, and finally the last ⅓ for another 10 seconds. Turn off the mixer as soon as you see the flour mixed in.
  8. Pour the hot milk into a large bowl and add the vanilla. Next add a generous cup of the egg mixture into the hot milk and whisk quickly and briskly until it’s a smooth, thick, and foamy mixture. 
  9. Turn the mixer back on speed 1 and slowly pour the milk mixture into the bowl and mix for 10 seconds. Turn the mixer off and take out the whisk.
  10. Use a rubber spatula to scrape down the sides and gently fold a couple of times to combine any separate egg batter and milk batters until it is smooth.
  11. Pour the batter into the prepared pan.
  12. Hold the baking pan by the edges and bang the pan down on the counter 8-10 times (I first put down a wet kitchen towel so it deadens some of the sound) to burst any large bubbles in the batter.
  13. Bake for about 20-25 minutes until golden brown and a toothpick testing the middle comes out clean. 
  14. Let the cake cool on the counter for 15 minutes before gently turning it out of the pan onto a cooling rack.
  15. Let the cake cool completely before frosting. 

For the Frosting:

  1. Place the flour, sugar, and milk in a saucepan and whisk until the mixture is smooth and lump free.
  2. Put the pan over medium heat and cook, stirring constantly with a whisk, until the mixture has thickened and looks like a custard or pudding, about 12 minutes.
  3. Take a tiny taste. There should be no floury or powdery taste. If it does, cook it for another minute or two to cook it out.
  4. Remove the pan from the heat, add the vanilla extract and salt, and stir to combine.
  5. Then transfer this sweet roux into a bowl. Cover it with plastic wrap, pressing the plastic wrap down onto the surface to prevent a skin from forming. 
  6. Let the bowl cool to room temperature (you can speed this up by putting the bowl in the freezer for 20-30 minutes). You can also make this ahead and store it in the fridge until ready to make the frosting. You will need to let the roux warm up to room temperature first before continuing with the frosting. The closer in temperature the roux and the butter are to each other, the easier it will be to whip up a thick and smooth frosting. (Do not use the roux warm as it will melt the butter and you will have a soupy mess. A little cold is fine as it will warm up as it gets beaten.)
  7. Place the butter into the mixing bowl with the whisk attachment. Beat the butter on medium high speed (#8 speed on the stand/handheld mixer) for about 3 minutes until the butter is fluffy and is a pale color.
  8. Lower the mixer speed to medium (#6 speed on the stand/handheld mixer) and start adding the sweet roux to the butter in generous 2 tablespoon increments. As soon as the roux gets blended in, add in another dollop of roux. (You can turn off the mixer when you’re making the additions if you find yourself making a mess. Then turn the mixer on to #6 speed to incorporate. Switch between on and off until all of the roux has been mixed in.)
  9. Once all of the roux is added, raise the speed to #8 (medium high), and whip the frosting for 2 to 3 minutes until the frosting is thick, fluffy, and can hold its shape in peaks. Set it aside while you prep the fruit. 

Prep the Fruit:

  1. Wash and dry the strawberries.
  2. Slice the strawberries into thick slices. Set aside in a bowl.
  3. Wash and dry the blueberries on paper towels. Lay a couple of new sheets of paper towel in a bowl and set the blueberries in the bowl to finish drying and soak up any remaining water.
  4. Wash and peel the mangoes.
  5. Slice both of the mango into thin slices cutting around the pit.
  6. Using a small 1 inch biscuit cutter, punch a circle out of one of the slices and set aside.
  7. Next cut out 3 small stars, approximately 1” in size, out of the mango slices, either using a cutter or using a small knife.
  8. Cut 8 small strips about 1 inch long and then 16 shorter strips to put around the circle to form the center star.

Assemble the Cake:

  1. Cut the cake in half horizontally using a serrated knife.
  2. Transfer the bottom piece of cake to a serving platter since it is difficult to transfer the cake once it is frosted and decorated.*
  3. Put about 4 cups of frosting on the bottom piece of the cake. Using an offset spatula, spread the frosting smoothly across the surface. Lay the thin slices of mango across the cake evenly.
  4. Cover with the top piece of cake. Use another 4 cups of frosting to smooth over the top and sides. Then put the rest of the frosting into a piping bag set with a medium round tip and set aside. You will be piping a border after you place the fruit.
  5. Next, find the center of your cake and draw a light mark through the frosting using a chopstick or some utensil. Draw one line horizontally and one line vertically through this center spot. Then draw a line from the top left corner to the center spot. And finally draw a line from the bottom left corner to the center spot. You will see that you have drawn a triangle on the left side that cuts into the two halves of the cake.
  6. Now it’s time to decorate with your prepared fruit.
  7. At the intersection of the lines, start putting down a row of strawberries on the bottom half of the cake just under the line, on the right side of the triangle. Overlap the strawberries slightly, like shingles. Keep the strawberries just shy of the edge of the cake. You will be filling up the entire wedge section below the triangle on the left side.
  8. Now place the three small mango stars at the three corners of the triangle area on the left. In the center of the triangle, place the circle. Next take the eight longer strips and place them around the circle. Finally you will take the sixteen smaller strips and put two strips next to each of the longer strips. 
  9. Next you will place the blueberries at the top of the cake so that they mirror the strawberries. Start right above the strawberries and neatly place the blueberries in even lines all the way to the top and edge of the cake. 
  10. Pick up the piping bag and push out any air at the open top of the bag and twist it shut. Squeeze from the top of the bag until you see some frosting coming out of the tip. Hold the tip close to the bottom edge of the cake. Squeezing gently, pipe a straight line along the edge. Then do the same at the top edge of the cake. The piping helps the cake look sharper and neater.
  11. Take a quick look and admire your work!   
  12. Clean up any smudges around the platter and serve your flag cake with pride.

Notes

*I cheat when slicing a large cake and typically will cut down the center to the middle of the cake. Then I will cut horizontally through the cake to where the cut is. This gives me greater control in slicing the cake in half more evenly and no one will notice that the bottom piece of the cake is actually two pieces. 

* This cake can be made a day or two ahead. Once the cake has cooled, immediately wrap it in parchment and then either wrap the parchment layer with plastic wrap or place the parment wrapped cake in an airtight container. The parchment paper will keep the cake from sticking to the wrap or container. 

*You can make the frosting ahead of time and store it in the fridge. Let the frosting warm up for about 1 hour before whipping for a minute on medium speed to loosen it up.

Keywords: cake, dessert, sweets, filipino, flag cake

Coffee Jelly

Coffee Jelly

I love gelatin desserts. Not the ubiquitous neon hued jello that played heavily at school cafeterias, but all of the the amazing desserts that rely on humble gelatin: from the silky creaminess of panna cottas to the sinful richness of a bittersweet chocolate mousse and read more

Coconut Flan

Coconut Flan

Coconut Flan is one of the most popular desserts on our menu. And while it is a nod to the enduring love Miamians have for Latin American flan (you can seriously get flan even at our gas stations), the addition of coconut makes it closer read more

Matcha Chocolate Cashews

Matcha Chocolate Cashews

They say everyone is a little Irish on St. Patrick’s Day, and I think this year I’ll get my bit of green from these Matcha Chocolate Cashews. Sweet and crunchy, this treat is made from three different Superfoods-chocolate, matcha powder, and heart healthy nuts. (You can learn more about matcha here) They are great when you want just a little something sweet after a meal, or a midday pick me up. They even make a good grab and go breakfast, complete with a caffeine kick from the matcha. They are great to set out with cocktails too…

Tempering Chocolate

I start with tempered chocolate, either chocolate disks specifically made for melting or the chocolate chunks I got from Trader Joe’s this time. Most chocolate chips have added ingredients so the chocolate keeps its shape in cookies and such. They are produced to NOT melt easily and they won’t set up (harden) properly when making these. So keep those for cookies and look for chocolate that is made for melting.

Tempering chocolate sounds so intimidating and I am no pastry chef so I try to keep it easy. In a nutshell, tempering keeps the chocolate at a temperature where the molecules stay intact and the cocoa butter doesn’t seep out. This allows the chocolate to harden at room temperature, keep a nice shiny finish, and snap if you were to break it. Chocolate that is not tempered correctly can have a dull grayish color and waxy texture. It will also not harden at room temperature.

Microwave?!

The established technique is to melt the chocolate, often with a double boiler, and then add chunks of chocolate to cool it down and bring it to the right temperature. I find that technique too time consuming and tedious. Let’s Microwave! But before you proceed to blast the hell out of your poor chocolate, let me set up a few guidelines. You need to do this in a gentle way that will carefully melt the chocolate so there’s no need to cool it down with an addition of unmelted chocolate.

Since each microwave is different, you may need to experiment a little to get the correct power strength. But in general, adjusting to 50% power is where I would start and what I use with my own microwave. I do quick bursts and it’s not necessary to melt the chocolate. You should see the chocolate soften (some chocolate may have melted) but the microwave ends up heating the bowl so much that gentle stirring should melt all of the chocolate. Continue microwaving in short minute increments but always stir between bursts until the chocolate is completely melted. If you have a candy thermometer, it should be about 90 degrees, or warm but not scalding hot to the touch. Let the chocolate cool a bit before proceeding.

With all of that said, since the matcha will be covering the chocolate, it’s not crucial to have a perfectly tempered chocolate; no one will see any imperfections. Also, if the chocolates don’t harden, you can put them in the fridge. But you will need to store the nuts in the fridge when you’re done to keep them from melting.

Matcha

Use the best matcha you can for this recipe. Since the matcha is the first thing you taste and there are few other flavors in this quick little recipe, you want a high quality. Lower quality matcha can have a really bitter taste, sometimes even an off flavor, plus an unappetizing color. The best choice is matcha meant for drinking, or a very high grade culinary one. A tablespoon might not seem like a lot, but because it is so finely ground that’s plenty to fully cover the cashews.

Enjoy the Matcha Chocolate Cashews as a little nibble with tea, or offer to guests as a light sweet to end a meal. I can’t wait for you to try them. Let me know what you think by commenting and rating the recipe below, and tag us in your pics @funkyasiankitchen for a chance to be featured; we love seeing your creations!

 

 

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matcha chocolate cashews recipe card

Matcha Chocolate Cashews

  • Author: Funky Asian Kitchen
  • Prep Time: 15 minutes
  • Cook Time: 25 minutes
  • Total Time: 40 minutes
  • Yield: serves 4 1x
  • Category: sweets

Ingredients

Scale
  • 1 cup toasted cashews (about 5 ounces)
  • 3 ounces semisweet or bittersweet dark chocolate, a generous ½ cup roughly chopped
  • 1 Tablespoon matcha powder

Garnish:

  • Maldon sea salt (optional)

Instructions

  1. Place the chocolate in a microwave-safe bowl.
  2. You will be microwaving in short increments, stirring in between.
  3. The exact amount of time the chocolate needs to be in the microwave will depend on your particular microwave. I do it for two minutes at 50% (half) power, stir with a whisk and then microwave again for another minute at 50% power. Stir again.
  4. The chocolate in the bowl will not look melted but as you stir, the heat from the bowl will continue melting the chocolate.
  5. Mix until the chocolate is completely smooth. Add another 30 seconds to a minute if you still have some unmelted chocolate. Always stir in between bursts in the microwave.
  6. If you have a candy thermometer (recommended), check to see that the temperature is 90 F (for dark, semisweet, and bittersweet chocolate) or 86 F (for milk and white chocolate). If not, dip a small spoon into the chocolate and put it on your hand. It should feel slightly warm, not hot.  
  7. Wait until the chocolate cools slightly before using it. 
  8. Add the cashews to the chocolate and mix to coat each nut. Place the nuts one at a time (or scoop them with a small spoon if you prefer making clusters) on a piece of parchment paper and let harden at room temperature for an hour or two.
  9. Once the chocolate has hardened, place the cashews in a small storage container and top with the matcha powder.
  10. Shake the nuts so that the matcha powder coats each nut evenly.
  11. Eat immediately, sprinkled with a little sea salt or store the Matcha Chocolate Cashews in the container until ready to consume.

Notes

*For this method to work, you MUST start with already tempered chocolate. You can use chocolate disks, which are made specifically for melting or blocks of tempered chocolate which can be chopped into small pieces. Do not use chocolate chips which will not melt. I used semi-sweet chocolate chunks from Trader Joe’s that are made for melting and they worked well.

*If you use chocolate that’s not tempered, you will know once you try to harden it at room temperature. Your cashews may refuse to set and stay wet or set kind of soft and fudgy. You can still harden it by putting it in the refrigerator. Then continue with the recipe but store the nuts in the fridge.

Keywords: sweets, snacks, nuts, matcha, chocolate