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Category: Gluten Free

Tinola

Tinola

Tinola is Filipino comfort food and perfect for cooler weather. This hearty chicken soup features a gingery broth that is so warming and smells amazing! Each bowl contains a whole piece of chicken and tender chunks of green papaya; a scoop of steamed rice is read more

Japanese Cheesecake

Japanese Cheesecake

There may not be a more crowd pleasing, popular dessert than cheesecake, and this Japanese Cheesecake is next level. It’s melt in your mouth delicious; part cheesecake and part soufflé. All the creamy tang of cheesecake, lightened with the airy cloudlike texture of a soufflé. read more

Shio Koji Salmon

Shio Koji Salmon

It may sound incredible that you can make some of the best salmon you’ve ever had with just TWO ingredients, but it’s true. Simple, fast, and fool proof, Shio Koji salmon uses a traditional Japanese method that creates deeply flavorful and moist salmon with just a few minutes of hands-on prep. Salmon is rich with Omega-3’s that are essential to heart health and this recipe helps you get it on the table with a minimum of fuss, so let’s get into it.

shio koji salmon

What is Shio Koji?

A favorite seasoning for Japanese home cooks, shio koji is made from rice inoculated with a harmless mold. (Mold also being a key ingredient in lots of yummy things from dry aged steaks to wine!) It is used to marinate and tenderize meat, and provides rich savory umami goodness. You can easily make your own shio koji at home, and I show you how here. It is also readily available online and in Asian markets that specialize in Japanese ingredients. 

Making Shio Koji Salmon

I like to use a skin on salmon fillet for this, and I start by cutting the salmon into equal portions. This isn’t so much a recipe as a method. Each serving of salmon (about 5-6 ounces) needs 1 Tablespoon of shio koji. I bought a package of salmon, which was about a pound, so I cut it into 3 servings. If you want a larger serving of salmon for each person, I suggest giving two smaller pieces rather than one large piece of fish. This will allow the shio koji to penetrate the fish evenly and fully.

portion salmon

coat salmon

The salmon should marinate in the shio koji for at least 6 hours. I like to leave it overnight for the most flavor. Plus it’s nice to start the day knowing your dinner is pretty much already taken care of! When you are ready to cook the salmon, make sure you take off an excess shio koji as it easily burns. I use my hands but you can use a paper towel if you prefer.

foil salmon

Broil the salmon for 6-8 minutes. You do not need to flip the salmon. Keep a close eye on it; I like it to get a good char in places but you don’t want it too burnt.

I like to serve Shio Koji Salmon with a simple green veggie like Sesame Green Beans or Japanese Style Spinach for an easy, healthful, and delicious meal. Try it and let me know what you think by commenting on the recipe below. And don’t forget to tag us in your pics @funkyasiankitchen, we love seeing your creations!

 

 

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recipe shio koji salmon

Shio Koji Salmon

  • Author: Funky Asian Kitchen
  • Prep Time: 5 minutes (plus marinating time)
  • Cook Time: 10 minutes
  • Total Time: 15 minutes
  • Yield: serves 3 1x
  • Category: Main
  • Cuisine: Japanese

Ingredients

Scale
  • 1 lb skin-on salmon fillet
  • 3 Tablespoons Shio Koji

Instructions

  1. Cut the salmon into 3 equal pieces. Pat dry with a paper towel and place the pieces of salmon into a storage container. 
  2. Pour the shio koji over the salmon and gently coat the salmon with the shio koji. 
  3. Cover and refrigerate the salmon overnight or at least 6 hours. The longer you marinate the salmon the more flavor will be absorbed.
  4. Move the oven rack to the second shelf from the top (about 8 inches from the heat source) and set the broiler to high.
  5. Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil and spray with a little oil (to keep the skin from sticking).
  6. Using your hands, wipe off the excess shio koji from the salmon and place the salmon skin side down on the baking sheet.
  7. Broil the salmon for 6-8 minutes. Keep an eye on it. It will get very caramelized. (You can put some foil on top or move it down another shelf if you think it’s getting too charred).
  8. I like salmon to be just cooked on the inside. If you prefer well done salmon, tip the pieces over to the side and continue cooking for another 2-3 minutes.
  9. Transfer the shio koji salmon to a plate, garnish with some lemon wedges and serve.

Keywords: salmon, marinate, healthy, japanese, seafood

Tsubuan (sweet red bean paste)

Tsubuan (sweet red bean paste)

Sweetened red bean paste, or Tsubuan, is probably one of Japan’s most recognized sweet flavors. It’s used in mochi, ice cream, and pastries. It’s even delightful just spread on toast. You can find tsubuan in Asian markets, but it’s so much better when made from read more

Roasted Sesame Dressing

Roasted Sesame Dressing

It’s time we settled the old Hellman’s vs Miracle Whip debate once and for all; Japanese mayo is the best mayo hands down. Richer, thicker, and with more yolky goodness than its American counterparts, it is essential to this Roasted Sesame Dressing. (And this Potato read more

Mango Sago

Mango Sago

 

When I need a really fast, make ahead sweet, I reach for this Mango Sago. Especially now, when mangoes are at their peak. Even with all of the annoying squirrels racing to get their fair share, I still have plenty left to make this recipe. With perfectly ripe summer fruit, this tropical dessert doesn’t even need any sugar. It’s creamy, cooling, refreshing and makes a beautiful presentation. Any leftovers make a great grab and go breakfast too!

I first had this dessert at a Singaporean restaurant in Manila many years ago. It’s a frequent dessert soup served at Chinese restaurants. After a rich meal, this mildly sweet, fruity offering is a sophisticated step above cut oranges. And with just a couple of quick easy steps, you too can have this on your table tonight!

mango sago ingredients

Sago

Sago are tapioca pearls, made from the starch of the cassava root. The starch gets gelatinized when cooked, which then thickens liquid into a pudding-like consistency. Sago pudding can be made with all kinds of fruit, and is enjoyed throughout Southeast Asia. Mango Sago is said to have originated in Hong Kong, where it is appreciated for its tropical flavors. Be careful to get the small white pearls, not the larger black or brown tapioca that is used to make Boba Tea.

pearls mango sago

Preparing Mango Sago

This recipe relies on the sweetness of ripe summer mangoes. When selecting them, look for fruit that gives when you gently squeeze it and has a rich tangy aroma. While you don’t want rock hard, you don’t want super mushy/soft either, because we are going to cut some pretty cubes to garnish our mango sago.

If mangoes are not available or out of season, you can use frozen mangoes or even switch out the mangoes for strawberries, raspberries, or peaches. I’ve also had this soup many times with chunks of taro root floating in it, a traditional version which you can make year round.

skin mango sago

chunks mango sago

Blend until it’s a smooth puree and take a taste. If it’s not as sweet as you’d like, add the optional sugar. Then chill in the fridge for at least an hour until ready to combine with the tapioca. You can make the puree a day ahead too.

Cooking the Sago

It is crucial that your water is at a furious boil before you start. Use a whisk or fork to stir the water as you pour in the tapioca. You need the tapioca to be separate grains and tapioca loves to cling together. If you’re not attentive, you will end up with a tapioca raft, where your tapioca gels into one big blob. Once you’ve poured in the tapioca, lower the heat and cook the tapioca for 13-15 minutes, giving it a good whisk every couple minutes.

Turn off the heat and let the tapioca sit in the hot water for another 5 minutes. This soaking time allows the tapioca pearls to fully hydrate. Any hard white centers will disappear as they soak in the hot water so don’t worry about them. Once the pearls are translucent, drain them in a sieve and run under cool water to cool.

Now that the sago is cooked, it’s time to add the prepared mango puree.

Mix to combine:

Keep them in the fridge until ready to serve. The longer the Mango Sago sits, the more pudding like it becomes. I enjoy eating it immediately after making it as a chilled soup, and then having one the next day when it’s more like a tapioca pudding. Either way, it’s delicious. I hope this easy Mango Sago brightens up your summer. Let me know by commenting and rating the recipe, and tag us in your pics @funkyasiankitchen, we love seeing your creations!

 

 

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recipe mango sago

Mango Sago

  • Author: Funky Asian Kitchen
  • Prep Time: 15 minutes
  • Cook Time: 20 minutes
  • Total Time: 35 minutes
  • Yield: serves 4 1x
  • Category: sweets
  • Cuisine: Chinese

Ingredients

Scale
  • ¼ cup small tapioca pearls
  • 3 fresh ripe mangoes
  • 8 oz coconut milk or coconut cream
  • ¼ cup condensed milk
  • 23 Tablespoons sugar (optional depending on the sweetness of the mangoes)

Instructions

  1. Peel the mangos and then cut the mango off of the seed in thick slices. Take a couple of the nicest slices and cut them into ¼ inch chunks for garnishing (you should have about ½ cup). The rest will be blended. You should have about 1 pound of mango to puree. 
  2. In a blender, add the coconut milk, condensed milk, and mango. Blend until smooth, and transfer to a large bowl. Taste the puree. If it’s not as sweet as you would like, add the optional sugar to taste.
  3. Cover the bowl and then chill the mango puree for at least an hour before adding the tapioca. (You can make this the night before and store it covered in the fridge.)
  4. In a pot, bring 4 cups of water to a boil over high heat. Make sure the water is at a rapid boil, and then add the tapioca, whisking as you pour it in. (If the water is not boiling, the tapioca will stick together and you will create one gooey raft of tapioca). 
  5. Lower the heat to medium high and simmer for 13-15 minutes, whisking every couple of minutes. It’s ok if the tapioca still has a small white spot in the middle. It will disappear as it sits in the hot water.
  6. Turn off the heat and let the tapioca sit for 5 minutes or just until the tapioca is clear. Drain the tapioca into a sieve and rinse under running cold water to cool. Drain well.
  7. Add the tapioca to the mango puree and mix to combine. Pour into individual bowls and top with the reserved mango chunks. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

Notes

*Do not substitute Boba tea tapioca pearls which are a completely different product.

*If fresh mangoes are not available, feel free to substitute 1 pound of frozen mango or 2 cups of other fruit such as peaches, strawberries, or raspberries. Add sugar to taste once you have made the puree.

Keywords: mango, sago, desserts, summer, sweets, chinese, cantonese