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Tag: japanese

Tsubuan (sweet red bean paste)

Tsubuan (sweet red bean paste)

Sweetened red bean paste, or Tsubuan, is probably one of Japan’s most recognized sweet flavors. It’s used in mochi, ice cream, and pastries. It’s even delightful just spread on toast. You can find tsubuan in Asian markets, but it’s so much better when made from read more

Roasted Sesame Dressing

Roasted Sesame Dressing

It’s time we settled the old Hellman’s vs Miracle Whip debate once and for all; Japanese mayo is the best mayo hands down. Richer, thicker, and with more yolky goodness than its American counterparts, it is essential to this Roasted Sesame Dressing. (And this Potato read more

Corn Potage

Corn Potage

 

When corn is at its summer peak, I like to whip up this Japanese style Corn Potage. It’s a silky smooth soup which is unbelievably creamy. It always tastes like summer in a bowl to me and it couldn’t be easier to make. Delicious hot or chilled, corn potage deserves a place on your summer table.  You won’t believe how much deep corn flavor this soup has-the secret is using fresh corn 3 ways!

corn potage ingredients

What Is Corn Potage?

At first glance there’s nothing about this recipe, or its name, that seems particularly Japanese. Potage is actually French, and refers to a vegetable soup that has been rendered extra creamy by pureeing it and straining it through a sieve. Like Hambagu before it though, Corn Potage rode a wave of Western style food adapted in Japan. It is now so beloved that you can even get it from vending machines and there are countless brands of canned corn potage at the market. In my opinion, Corn Potage is the Japanese equivalent of American chicken noodle soup. But while I like convenience as much as the next busy mom, nothing beats homemade.

When we were kids, my mom would takes us to family restaurants or kisetans (cafe) in Japan, and this soup was ubiquitous, literally everywhere. We thought it was so sophisticated and grown up and always ordered it. If you have kids, I guarantee they will love this. It has a comforting simple flavor that screams corn. For me, it’s nostalgic and lovely, and reminds me of summer vacation in Japan.

beauty corn potage

Making Corn Potage

Since corn is the star here, seek out the best you can find. Local is great if you can find it!  Look for bright green, tightly wrapped husks that seem plump and heavy. Stay away from corn that has wet husks at the top which could indicate moldy corn.

shuck

But don’t throw those cobs out! We’re going to use them to infuse the stock with the sweet flavor of corn. cobs

After 20 minutes, discard the cobs and set the stock aside to cool.

butter

And now the Corn Potage is done!  I like to garnish it with corn kernels. A little swirl of cream is a nice touch too. You can add some chopped parsley for a burst of color, but the corn is the star here. Grab some fresh corn from a farmers’ market this weekend and see why this soup enjoys such enduring popularity in Japan. When you do, don’t forget to take a minute and rate or comment on the recipe below and tag us in your pics @funkyasiankitchen; we love hearing from you.

 

 

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recipe corn potage

Corn Potage

  • Author: Funky Asian Kitchen
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 20 Minutes
  • Total Time: 30 minutes
  • Yield: serves 4 1x
  • Category: soup
  • Cuisine: Japanese

Ingredients

Scale
  • 3 Tbsp butter
  • ½ onion, chopped finely
  • 1 clove garlic, roughly chopped
  • 1 ½ tablespoon flour
  • 2 cups chicken broth*
  • 3 ears corn
  • 1 cup milk
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • white pepper
  • chopped parsley, extra corn kernels, or heavy cream  for garnish

Instructions

  1. Shuck the corn, rubbing your hands up and down to remove the silk.
  2. Put a small ramekin upside down (You can use whatever small dish/cup you have) in a large bowl. Prop the corn up on the ramekin and then cut off the corn kernels with a sharp knife. The kernels will drop into the bowl. Set aside, saving the corn cobs.
  3. Put the corn cobs in a pot and add the chicken stock.
  4. Bring to a boil over high heat and then lower the heat to medium.
  5. Cover the pot and simmer for 20 minutes.
  6. Discard the corn cobs and set the chicken broth aside to cool. You should have 1 ¼ cups of broth. Add some water to make up the difference if needed.
  7. Melt the butter in a large pot over medium heat.
  8. Add the chopped onion and cook for 6-8 minutes until soft and translucent.
  9. Add the garlic and flour and cook for a minute. 
  10. Add the chicken broth in a slow stream, whisking constantly. Bring the mixture to a simmer over medium high heat.
  11. Add the corn kernels, stir and simmer for 3 minutes. 
  12. Pour the soup carefully into a blender cup, take the feed pour cover off, and cover the opening with a clean kitchen towel. Pulse and then puree until very smooth. 
  13. Strain through a sieve (do not use a fine sieve or nothing will get through. You are just trying to filter out some of the corn skin and heavy fibers), and pour back into the rinsed pot.
  14. Add the milk, salt, and pepper and heat over medium high heat for several minutes until the soup is hot. Taste and adjust seasoning if needed. If the soup is a little thick add a little a couple extra tablespoons of broth.
  15. Garnish corn potage with a little chopped parsley, some extra corn kernels, or a splash of heavy cream before serving.

Notes

*To make this vegetarian, use a good vegetable stock.

Keywords: summer, corn, soup, japanese

 

Cold Ramen

Cold Ramen

July and August in Japan (and really almost everywhere) can be incredibly hot and humid. So instead of steaming hot bowls of noodle soups, they turn to cold noodles, including this hiyashi chuka, a vibrantly colorful cold ramen noodle bowl. Hiyashi Chuka translates to “chilled Chinese”, read more

Japanese Fried Chicken

Japanese Fried Chicken

Well guys, I did it. I finally caved to peer pressure and I got an air fryer. And wow am I having fun playing with it!  We have this Japanese Fried Chicken on our restaurant menus, and it is hugely popular. I wanted to see read more

Coffee Jelly

Coffee Jelly

I love gelatin desserts. Not the ubiquitous neon hued jello that played heavily at school cafeterias, but all of the the amazing desserts that rely on humble gelatin: from the silky creaminess of panna cottas to the sinful richness of a bittersweet chocolate mousse and especially the simple delight of Coffee Jelly. This Coffee Jelly is perfect for people who don’t like overly sweet desserts. Or for people who just really love coffee. It’s also a wonderful dessert for people who aren’t naturally blessed with baking genes. You are rewarded with a quick and sophisticated dessert without even turning on your oven.

Coffee Jelly is a nostalgic and common dessert in Japan and Vietnam loves their drip coffee sweetened with condensed milk. My Coffee Jelly is a bit of a mashup of the two. It’s completely make ahead and you can do all the prep in less time than it will take you to remember what comes after, “watch it wiggle, see it jiggle”; so let’s get into it.

coffee jelly ingredients

Making Coffee Jelly

In Japan, coffee jelly is so ubiquitous you’ll find it in every grocery and convenience store, packaged like ready to eat Jello. It’s not very sweet, as Japanese people generally don’t favor super sweet foods. Vietnam, on the other hand, has a prolific pastry and dessert culture. Their coffee jelly is usually a somewhat more complicated affair, stacking layers of sweetened cream with layers of coffee jelly. I keep the simplicity of the Japanese version but use a robust Vietnamese coffee, serving it with dreamy, sweetened condensed milk-it’s the best of both worlds!

gelatin coffee jelly

Once the gelatin is mixed, it’s time to make the coffee. I like to use the famed chicory coffee from Cafe du Monde in New Orleans. The chicory gives it a very robust, earthy flavor that is similar to Vietnamese coffee. If you would like it less intense, feel free to use whichever ground coffee you prefer.

steep coffee jelly

Once it’s chilled and set, it’s ready to enjoy.  I serve it with condensed milk on the side. That way people with a big sweet tooth can add it to their heart’s content. The contrast of the sweet, creamy milk with the rich coffee jelly is like the most heavenly latte you’ve ever had.

Word of caution-this is a caffeinated dessert. So if you are really sensitive to caffeine you might want to enjoy this a little earlier in the day. Hey, there’s no law saying this can’t be breakfast… Whip up this easy, elegant Coffee Jelly and let me know what you think. Rate and comment on the recipe below, and don’t forget to tag us in your pics @funkyasiankitchen; we love hearing from you!

 

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recipe coffee jelly

Coffee Jelly

  • Author: Funky Asian Kitchen
  • Prep Time: 3 minutes
  • Cook Time: 5 minutes (plus chill time)
  • Total Time: 8 minutes
  • Yield: serves 4 1x
  • Category: sweets
  • Cuisine: Japanese

Ingredients

Scale
  • 8 grams gelatin powder (1 packet Knox gelatin)
  • 3 tablespoons vietnamese coffee and 2 cups boiling water (I use Cafe Du Monde chicory and coffee in the yellow can)
  • 4 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 1 can condensed milk

Instructions

  1. Put the gelatin powder in a bowl and mix with 2 tablespoons of cold water. Set aside.
  2. Bring 2 cups of water to a boil in a small pot and turn off the heat. Add the coffee to the pot and steep for 5 minutes. Strain through a coffee/tea filter.
  3. Rinse the pot, pour the coffee back in, and put it back on the stove. Add the sugar and bring the coffee to a simmer over high heat. As soon as it starts to bubble, turn off the heat and add the gelatin. 
  4. Mix the gelatin into the coffee with a whisk or spoon for a couple minutes until the gelatin has fully dissolved.
  5. Let the mixture cool for 10 minutes. 
  6. Pour the mixture into 4 small cups, cover with a lid or plastic wrap, and refrigerate for 2 to 3 hours, or until the jelly has set.
  7. Serve coffee jelly with the condensed milk on the side.

Keywords: coffee, desserts, japanese, vietnamese, coffee jelly, sweets, make ahead